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Unoriginal Love

Conforming since 1983. Enjoy the thought bubbles.

Aug 22nd at 9AM / 0 notes

Airplanes around thunderstorms


Pic of the Day: Check Out the View From the Top of the Golden Gate Bridge
—The Daily What

Pic of the Day: Check Out the View From the Top of the Golden Gate Bridge

—The Daily What


"Wake up early. Drink coffee. Work hard. Be ambitious. Keep your priorities straight, your mind right and your head up. Do well, live well and dress really well. Do what you love, love what you do. It is time to start living."

Aug 22nd at 8AM / via: uhmmsobasically / op: rustedbones / 91,937 notes

Joke of the day.

Aug 22nd at 8AM / via: lowendthe0ry / op: flyingscotsman / 396,259 notes

wanderoar:

roseonabeach:

frostedsammy:

An Englishman, a Frenchman, a Spaniard and a German are all standing watching a street performer do some excellent juggling. The juggler notices that the four gentlemen have a very poor view, so he stands up on a large wooden box and calls out, “Can you all see me now?”

“Yes.”
“Oui.”
“Sí.”
“Ja.”

what

Took me about ten minutes to finally understand this

stupidest/most awesome joke ever


fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)
Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.
He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.
Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:
Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.
Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club. 
Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window. 
Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.
Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.
Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 
But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.
And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)

Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.

He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.

Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:

Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.

Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club

Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window

Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.

Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.

Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 

But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.

And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.


Aug 21st at 5PM / via: starringmarlonbrando / op: curiovsly / 184,122 notes

Aug 21st at 2PM / via: islanddancer / op: amroyounes / 53,380 notes

taconoms:

uni-t-e-a:

amroyounes:

Time to show some love and appreciate these heroes.

Firefighters are some badass mutha fuckas

firefighters are incredibly under appreciated, this is sadly the first appreciation post to them and we need more of these, they literally walk through hell to pick up people and pull them out, they are all Castiels if all civilians are Deans, and they save animals, treating all like humans, i have never heard of a firefighter that has chosen not to save someone for there race or sex or sexuality or anything, a human is a human and an animal is an animal, i love these people and they don’t deserve to be ignored as much as they are


Aug 21st at 12PM / via: gymra / op: primegifs / 10,084 notes

Aug 21st at 11AM / via: eightyfiver / op: obi-wankenblowme / 102,356 notes

eightyfiver:

ghettoanime:

obi-wankenblowme:

This is a collection of Tweets from military veterans reacting to the police response in Ferguson. 

And if this shit doesn’t scare you, I don’t know what will.

Look. At. This. Shit.

This was actually the first thing that came to my mind when i saw the police in riot gear pointing their assault rifles at unarmed civilians. We did crowd- and riot control in basic training and even we were taught ROE and how to behave in these situations, but i can’t see any of the policemen shown in the media behave the way we were taught to.